Tag Archives: Rabbits

Alzheimer’s, Wildfires, Ebola, Rabbits and Cubed Poo

Alzheimer’s, Wildfires, Ebola also Rabbits and Cubed Poo! Today’s featured shows.

Alzheimer’sStarting off today’s double feature we have Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy.

In the latest episode of Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy’s Survival Medicine Hour, Joe and Amy Alton discuss the President’s response to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, the wildfires in California and how to keep your family safe, and a surprising possible cause of Alzheimer’s Disease (hint: It’s in your mouth). Continue reading Alzheimer’s, Wildfires, Ebola, Rabbits and Cubed Poo

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Meat Rabbits for the Homestead

RabbitsMeat rabbits for the homestead. Beyond chickens, probably the “next best”, most productive animal for the homestead is the meat rabbit. Rabbits are inexpensive, easy-to-raise, prolific, quiet, and take a minimal amount of space. And, they produce the leanest meat of all domestic animals as well as usable pelts and incredibly-rich garden fertilizer.

Of course, many people are put off by the idea of eating what they consider a pet animal and can’t picture themselves being able to dispatch “those cute bunnies”. But the reality is, if times Rabbitsget tough(er) and you need a delicious protein source for your hungry family, you will quickly get over your apprehensions and be grateful you have a ready source of meat. (Quite frankly, 3 month old rabbits – which is prime butchering age — aren’t nearly as cute and cuddly as what you are imagining.)

A breeding trio of rabbits, that is, two females and one male, could easily produce 42 babies a year. If these youngsters are butchered at 3-4 pounds, this translates into approximately 150 pounds of meat per year.

Meat RabbitThere are many breeds of domestic rabbits but for many meat producers the New Zealand white and Californian are two of the more popular. Fryers, bakers, roasters, and stewers are the names given to meat rabbits. Their age and weight will determine their title. Want to learn more? Then tune in this Thursday, September 12, to the Homestead Honey Hour where we will dive into this subject to help you get started raising rabbits!

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Rabbits and HAM: Food and Commo for the End of the World!

One of the 8-28Rabbits2simplest ways to prepare for disaster is to buy and stock up on ready-made foods and gear. There is nothing wrong with this unless it is your only strategy or unless you are only interested in being able to survive for a week or two. However, during any kind of disaster that might last weeks, months or indefinitely, it is necessary to have a longer-term plan. This involves sustainable food and sustainable, effective communications.

The most i8-28Rabbits3important thing to remember about long-term prepping is that there is a point where skills actually start to trump gear. Nobody can live indefinitely off of nothing but supplies if there are no skills to allow for sustainable resources. In the case of food, this realistically should include meat. Sustainable meat is very easy to provide in a number of ways, but one of the easiest and most convenient for the prepper is backyard rabbits.

Just like sustaina8-28Commo1ble food, the prepper also should be concerned with sustainable communications. That is, not only radio systems that work and have range, but also are powered by a sustainable, off-grid power source. If you could only choose one type of radio to become involved with as a prepper, learn about and operate, it should probably be HAM or amateur radio.

Join Sam Coffman on The Human Path in today’s broadcast as he explains some tips and tricks for back yard rabbits as a sustainable food source, and also discusses various forms of post-disaster communication to include amateur radio.

Listen to this show in player below.

You can also listen to archived shows of all our hosts . Go to show schedule tab at top of page!
You can also listen, download, or use your own default player for this show by clicking Here!
Sam’s survival school is called The Human Path and can be found online here:  http://www.thehumanpath.com
His YouTube site can be found here:  www.youtube.com/TheHumanPath

 

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